PREVENT HEATSTROKE

Babies and young kids can sometimes sleep so peacefully that we forget they are even there. It can also be tempting to leave a baby alone in a car while we quickly run into the store. The problem is that leaving a child alone in a car can lead to serious injury or death from heatstroke. Young children are particularly at risk, as their bodies heat up three to five times faster than an adult’s. These tragedies are completely preventable. Here’s how we can all work together to keep kids safe from heatstroke.

Hard Facts

Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths for children. On average, every 10 days a child dies from heatstroke in a vehicle.

Top Tips

Reduce the number of deaths from heatstroke by remembering to ACT.

A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own.

C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine.

T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.
– See more: here
(SafeKids.org)

look-before-you-lock-back Reminder poster.

Cars pose many other dangers, including and not limited to power windows and car trunk entrapment.
Lots of helpful information may be found at KIDSANDCARS.ORG

Do Pre-K work?

A lengthy article that does not shy away from ‘research speak‘, nevertheless it is full insightful information. If you feel that the article contradicts views expressed in the video, well it does. As with a lot of things, the truth probably lies somewhere in the middle between the two extremes of view. What I do like about the two sources of information is that by explaining the limitations of studies it illustrates beautifully how tricky interpreting statistics can be.

Article Link

The above does not represent my political persuasion but illustrates the issues states have when providing early learning programs.
I am A FIRM supporter of QUALITY early learning intervention provided by whichever political party.

Children’s Allergies

An estimated 50 million Americans have some type of allergy. In most people, allergies first appear during infancy or childhood. Allergic disorders rank first among children’s chronic diseases.

Any child may become allergic, but children from families with a history of allergy are more likely to be allergic. Children may inherit the tendency to become allergic from their parents, but only some of them will develop an active allergic disease. Children’s allergies can show up in different ways including:

  • Skin rashes (atopic dermatitis or eczema)
  • Asthma
  • Allergic rhinitis (also known as “hay fever”)
  • Food allergies

Allergic rhinitis is the most common of all childhood allergies. It causes runny, itchy nose, sneezing, postnasal drip and nasal congestion (blockage). The child with allergies may also have itchy, watery and red eyes and chronic ear problems. Despite its common name, “hay fever”, these allergy problems can occur at any time of the year — seasonally or year-round, and do not cause fever.

The following are just a few points on potential problems for children with allergic rhinitis. Early identification of allergy problems in your child will improve their quality of life, decrease missed school days and keep you at work.

Nasal congestion

Allergies are the most common cause of chronic nasal congestion in children. Sometimes a child’s nose is congested (blocked) to the point that he or she breathes through the mouth, especially while sleeping. This may also cause the child to not get a restful night’s sleep and then be tired the next day. If the congestion and mouth breathing are left untreated, they can cause abnormal changes the way the teeth and the bones of the face grow. Early treatment of the allergies causing the nasal congestion may prevent these problems.

Allergy and ear infections

Allergies lead to inflammation in the ear and may cause fluid accumulation that can promote ear infections and decreased hearing. If this happens when the child is learning to talk, poor speech development may result. Allergies can cause earaches as well as ear itching, popping and fullness (“stopped up ears”). Anyone with these symptoms should be considered for testing and treatment.

Allergies at school

Fall means going back to school. For children with allergies, that may mean absences due to problems related to allergic rhinitis. The following are suggestions for helping the allergic child and problems to look for so that allergy can be properly diagnosed and treated.

Allergy or asthma action plan for emergencies

If your child has asthma or severe allergy, provide your child’s action plan to the school nurse or administrative office. Also discuss your child’s access to medication in case of an emergency.

School pets: Furry animals in school may cause problems for allergic children. If your child has more problems while at school, it could be the class pet.
Asthma and physical education: Physical education and sports are a big part of the school day for many children. Having asthma does not mean eliminating these activities. Children with asthma and other allergic diseases should be able to participate in any sport the child chooses, provided the doctor’s advice is followed. Asthma symptoms during exercise may indicate poorly control. Be sure that your child is taking controller asthma medications on a regular basis. Often medication administered by an inhaler is prescribed before exercise to control their symptoms.
Dust irritation: At school, children with allergic problems may need to sit away from the blackboards to avoid irritation from chalk dust.

Food allergic infants

The best food for a newborn is mother’s milk. However, some especially sensitive babies can have allergic reactions to foods their mothers eat. Babies can be tested for allergies. Eliminating these foods from the mother’s diet may provide relief for the child.

As infants grow, their nutritional needs continue to change and your physician will advise when it is time for solid foods.

Cow’s milk can cause allergies in children, but it is a good source of protein and calcium. Milk should be eliminated from a child’s diet only if you are sure the child is allergic to it. Parents may suspect allergy if the child exhibits hives after the ingestion of milk or other dairy products. If you suspect your child may be allergic to milk, consult your physician, who may conduct appropriate tests to verify the allergy and prescribe the proper course of treatment for children allergies.

Just remember:

Allergies in children are common.
Many childhood problems are made worse by allergies.
Treatment of your child’s allergies will make them happier and healthier.

 
Source: ACAAI- American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology- link

Diaper Rash (Diaper Dermatitis)

Most babies get diaper rash, but it is usually not serious. Read on to find out more about what causes diaper rash and how to treat it.

What is diaper rash?

Diaper rash is any rash that develops inside the diaper area. In mild cases, the skin might be red. In more severe cases, there may be painful open sores. It is usually seen around the groin and inside the folds of the upper thighs and buttocks. Mild cases clear up within 3 to 4 days with treatment.

What causes diaper rash?

Over the years diaper rash has been blamed on many causes, such as teething, diet, and ammonia in the urine. However, we now believe it is caused by any of the following:

  • Too much moisture
  • Chafing or rubbing
  • When urine, stools, or both touch the skin for long periods of time
  • Yeast infection
  • Bacterial infection
  • Allergic reaction to diaper material

When skin stays wet for too long, it starts to break down. When wet skin is rubbed, it also damages more easily. Moisture from a soiled diaper can harm your baby’s skin and make it more prone to chafing. When this happens, a diaper rash may develop.

More than half of babies between 4 and 15 months of age develop diaper rash at least once in a 2-month period. Diaper rash occurs more often when

  • Babies get older—mostly between 8 to 10 months of age.
  • Babies are not kept clean and dry.
  • Babies have frequent stools, especially when the stools stay in their diapers overnight.
  • Babies have diarrhea.
  • Babies begin to eat solid foods.
  • Babies are taking antibiotics, or in nursing babies whose mothers are taking antibiotics.

When to call the pediatrician

Sometimes a diaper rash needs medical attention. Talk with your pediatrician if

The rash does not look like it’s going away or gets worse 2 to 3 days after treatment. (See “What can I do if my baby gets diaper rash?”)

The rash includes blisters or pus-filled sores.

Your baby is taking an antibiotic and has a bright red rash with red spots at its edges. This might be a yeast infection.

Your baby has a fever along with a rash.

The rash is very painful. Your baby might have a skin condition called cellulitis.

What can I do if my baby gets diaper rash?

If your baby gets a diaper rash (and to prevent future diaper rashes) it’s important to keep the area as clean and dry as possible. Change wet or soiled diapers right away. This helps cut down how much moisture is on the skin.

Gently clean the diaper area with water and a soft washcloth. Disposable diaper wipes may also be used. Avoid wipes that contain alcohol and fragrance. Use soap and water only if the stool does not come off easily. If the rash is severe, use a squirt bottle of water so you can clean and rinse without rubbing.

Pat dry; do not rub. Allow the area to air-dry fully.

Apply a thick layer of protective ointment or cream (such as one that contains zinc oxide or petroleum jelly). These ointments are usually thick and pasty and do not have to be completely removed at the next diaper change. Remember, heavy scrubbing or rubbing will only damage the skin more.

Do not put the diaper on too tight, especially overnight. Keep the diaper loose so that the wet and soiled parts do not rub against the skin as much.

Use creams with steroids only if your pediatrician recommends them. They are rarely needed and may be harmful.

*Check with your pediatrician if the rash*

— Has blisters or pus-filled sores.

— Does not go away within 2 to 3 days.

— Gets worse.

Which type of diaper should I use?

Diapers are made of either cloth or disposable materials. Cloth diapers can be washed after they get soiled and used again. Disposable diapers are thrown away after each use.

If you choose not to wash cloth diapers yourself, you can have a diaper service clean them. If you do your own washing, you will need to presoak heavily soiled diapers. Keep and wash soiled diapers separate from other clothes. Use hot water and double-rinse each wash. Do not use fabric softeners or antistatic products on the diapers because they may cause rashes in sensitive skin.

Research suggests that diaper rash is less common with the use of disposable diapers. However, what is more important than the type of diaper is how often it is changed. Whether you use cloth diapers, disposables, or both, always change diapers as needed to keep your baby clean, dry, and healthy.

For more information, visit the official AAP Web site for parents, <HealthyChildren.org>